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  • Chelsea Chelsea

    Chelsea

    Communications Representative

    Chelsea

    Chelsea

    Communications Representative

    • Chelsea shares details about her transition from college to the workforce.
    • Chelsea is a graduate of Texas Christian University and joined Lockheed Martin with an interest in community outreach.

    In college, community outreach and inclusiveness were extremely important to me. After applying to several for-profit companies, I found my desires for promoting diversity and helping the community still lingered. Never in a million years did I think a large corporation like Lockheed Martin would help me align my career goals and interests. The inclusiveness here has been felt and appreciated.

    As a Communications Representative at Lockheed Martin, recognizing inclusion and diversity continues to be an integral part of my personal and professional growth. I believe that diversity is more than acknowledging those who are different from you – it's a learning experience that allows you to view the world through a different lens. While here, I have felt reassured to find that my team shares a similar belief and that everyone is welcomed.

    No matter my coworkers' rank at Lockheed Martin, they never make me feel like the "new kid on the block." I enjoy meeting with my mentor, who is showing me the different paths I can take within the company. It's nice to be at a place where my work, professional growth and ideas are valued.

    Apart from my welcoming and collaborative team, I have found formal groups that share similar interests as me. My involvement with groups like the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has allowed me to network and become involved with the community and company. I have attended multiple events through organizations like the African American Council for Excellence (AACE), Toastmasters, Lockheed Martin Leadership Association (LMLA) and LMents. Each group has helped with my transition into this company and has given me the ability to meet many industry-leaders.

    At Lockheed Martin, we strive to embrace all ideas and serve the community. Now with six months of the "real world" under my belt, I can already look back and see the importance of coworkers welcoming me. I'm looking forward to doing the same for future associates!

    Chelsea Chelsea is a part of the Aeronautics business area at Lockheed Martin.
  • Julissa Julissa

    Julissa

    Workforce Strategy

    Julissa

    Julissa

    Workforce Strategy

    • Julissa explains her relationship-centric take on the acronym ROI
    • Here are the two simple questions Julissa asks herself every work day: What problem do I need to solve today? How can I leverage or develop relationships?

    The acronym ROI in the workplace refers to the measurement of Relationships Over Issues. It is critical to build relationships with co-workers in order to have a productive and healthy work environment. Unfortunately, for many years my ROI rate was less than desirable. I was more focused on work than on building relationships with my team.

    I started my career at Lockheed Martin straight out of college, and luckily for me it was a great fit from the beginning. I entered having a results-oriented mindset; however, over time I have learned the importance of slowing down and establishing relationships with my colleagues. This learning experience directly correlates to our leadership's high value for collaboration with open and honest communication.

    At Lockheed Martin, we work with extremely bright and talented people. What makes us unique is that we all have diverse backgrounds with different experiences. Working among peers who think differently allows us all to see the world in a different light. We are able to learn something new from each other every day. The result is a team that is empowered to collaborate and bring forth creative solutions that encourage mission success.

    As you look to measure your ROI by assessing the relationship strength with colleagues and customers, here are some questions to consider:

    • Have you taken the time to get to know someone?
    • Do others see you as someone they can count on?

    After reflecting on the relationships I have fostered over the years, I can happily say that my ROI is in the positive. This approach opened my aperture to develop meaningful relationships at work and allowed me to balance both my short- and long-term goals, which helped me advance my career. As John C. Maxwell once said, "People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care."

    Julissa Julissa participating as a panelist at an IT conference.
  • Sarfaraz Sarfaraz

    Sarfaraz

    Price Cost Analyst

    Sarfaraz

    Sarfaraz

    Price Cost Analyst

    • Sarfaraz shares his journey from Pakistan to chase the American dream.
    • Sarfaraz speaks Punjabi, Urdu, English and some Arabic.
    • Sarfaraz won second place at the Toastmasters World Championship of Public Speaking.

    Many moons ago, I stepped off a Boeing 747 at John F. Kennedy International Airport and stepped onto American soil for the first time, in search of a better future. I spent my first night in America at the YMCA in Oklahoma City. The next morning I took a bus and arrived at the administration building at Oklahoma State University with one suitcase, one carry-on bag and one briefcase with a cashier's check for three semesters of tuition and expenses.

    I learned from my parents, who led a simple life, about integrity, ethical conduct and treating everyone with dignity and respect because each individual is significant. Treating everyone with kindness has allowed me to excel during my 25 years at Lockheed Martin. Mutual respect for one another has enabled me, as a Price Cost Analyst in the Global Supply Chain at Missiles and Fire Control in Dallas, to work effectively with my peers and management, our suppliers and our customers.

    I believe valuing our differences and working in harmony with one another allows us to do our job with an attitude that uplifts all of us. Treating others with dignity, respect and appreciating all viewpoints has allowed me to be successful in my work. It is the reason for where I am today and for how far I have come since the day I first arrived in America.

    If I add up what I have accomplished and subtract from it what I came to America with – one suitcase, one carry-on bag and one briefcase with a cashier's check for three semesters of tuition and expenses – the difference is "The American Dream."

    Sarfaraz Sarfaraz received second place at the Toastmasters International 2000 World Championship of Public Speaking semifinals in Galveston, Texas.
  • Sean Sean

    Sean

    Senior Engineer

    Sean

    Sean

    Senior Engineer

    • Sean is a member of the Advanced Technology Laboratories where he's focused on making systems smarter through the application of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    For the past three years, my role within Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been multifaceted, challenging and exciting. As a member in the Spectrum Systems Laboratory within ATL, I was the test lead on the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Behavioral Learning for Adaptive Electronic Warfare (BLADE) program, an effort to build a cognitive Electronic Warfare (EW) system that can engage adaptive wireless communication targets and develop effective electronic attack techniques in real time.

    My main objective was to design laboratory and field tests, and supervise their execution. While I hoped for BLADE to succeed, I was also very interested in understanding how BLADE performed. I realized that my success, and that of the BLADE team, was best measured by how efficiently we used the time we spent testing.

    Whenever a test would fail, I'd remind myself that it wasn't necessarily a bad thing so we could walk away with an understanding of the causes of failure in order to improve future results. Often, when this occurred in the field, my team and I would work to devise a new plan on the spot. Our willingness and ability to improvise became our best attribute, without which success would have been impossible. I found that regrouping with my team to reorganize strategies was incredibly useful. As a result, this became a daily occurrence on our days of field testing.

    The BLADE team's ability to collaborate and think on their feet enabled an excellent demo that left an indelible mark on those who witnessed it. As a result of our efforts, the BLADE team was awarded a Lockheed Martin NOVA award and two ATL special recognition awards, and I received an Engineer of the Year Award during ATL's 2016 Honors Night. But more importantly, we established credibility with our customer community and developed an incredible bond in order to begin working toward bringing BLADE technology out of the experimental realm and into warfighter's hands.

    Sean Sean out in the field with team.
  • Stephanie Stephanie

    Stephanie

    Project Manager

    Stephanie

    Stephanie

    Project Manager

    • In 2016, Stephanie competed in the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii.
    • Stephanie shares how her Ironman training regimen and intense preparation benefits her at Lockheed Martin.

    1. What is involved in an Ironman Triathlon, and what does your training entail?
    Stephanie: An Ironman Triathlon is more than just a 140.6-mile, multi-sport race – it is a test of mental and physical strength. Training requires physical and mental preparation supported by a strong nutritional and recovery program. Physical training is for endurance; it is three hours a day Monday through Friday, and five to six hours a day on Saturday and Sunday. Mental training prepares the brain to endure the pain, suffering and, at times, boredom.

    2. How did you decide to get involved with Ironman?
    Stephanie: I began training for triathlons two years ago, in the summer of 2014. My husband and I signed up for a long-distance triathlon, and from then on I was hooked. I was extremely athletic in college, so it was a natural progression to gain the discipline in order to accomplish a triathlon.

    3. Have you ever wanted to stop training? What kept you going?
    Stephanie: Some days it's hard to feel motivated for that second workout (especially when it's 100 degrees outside) but no, I never want to quit. I know consistency helps me achieve my goals, so I don't like to give up.

    4. What benefits do you see at work as a result of your training?
    Stephanie: One of my favorite quotes is: "Excellence is the gradual result of always striving to do better." I am a goal-oriented person who thrives on checking items off a to-do list and achieving my goals, both in my personal and work life. The goal at work isn't a "PR" like a race, but to finish my projects, make improvements, and support my manager. I have had to remain focused throughout training and triathlons and these practices carry over into my work at Lockheed Martin as well.

    Stephanie Stephanie cycling as she pushes to complete an Ironman triathlon.
  • Rosa Rosa

    Rosa

    Applications Engineer, Aeronautics

    Rosa

    Rosa

    Applications Engineer, Aeronautics

    • Rosa has been an engineer with the Production Operations group at Lockheed Martin for over 10 years.
    • Rosa is a big advocate of increasing the number of women in STEM fields.
    • Her husband is also an engineer at Lockheed Martin, and they are both active members of the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers.

    At times, I reflect back and remember the choices I made that created a pathway to my Lockheed Martin career. One of the most important choices I made when pursuing an engineering degree was joining the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE). I was able to acquire my first internship at Lockheed Martin with the F-2 program through a job fair held at the annual SHPE National Conference. They offered interactive networking sessions; presentations by industry leaders; Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) development workshops; and technical and career opportunities to students and professionals.

    These experiences shaped my career path and helped me arrive in my current position. As an engineering professional, I joined SHPE Lockheed Martin Aeronautics to provide the same support and development that was initially offered to me. The organization strives to provide awareness of STEM initiatives and empower students in Tarrant County to enter technical roles.

    Today there are a limited number of women entering engineering fields. Women professionals can make a direct impact in helping young female students envision themselves in a STEM profession. Being a professional role model is truly rewarding, and we should all do our part by encouraging young female students to decide the avenue they will follow, rather than limit their choices based on perceptions.

    I highly encourage everyone to become involved in a STEM outreach organization. Providing a positive direction to students by enabling team participation and critical-thinking challenges allows for students with diverse backgrounds to have meaningful experiences. Through these events, students become fully engaged and obtain a deeper understanding and a greater appreciation for math and science. The engineering design activities prepare them to be in a competitive environment, strengthen their skill set and allow them to gain confidence in interactive, team-based activities.

  • Joe Joe

    Joe

    Government Relations Director

    Joe

    Joe

    Government Relations Director

    • Joe shares the history of the Purple Heart and the support available for wounded veterans.
    • Joe is a U.S. Army veteran.

    One of our nation's most recognizable medals for military service is the Purple Heart. August 7 marks Purple Heart Day and, as I reflect on the day's significance, I'm reminded that we owe a debt to each of the soldiers, sailors, Marines, airmen and Coast Guardsmen who are recipients of this most respected symbol.

    The origin story for the medal is pretty unique. The Badge of Merit was conceptually developed by George Washington to honor the brave and meritorious soldiers of his Continental Army, many of whom were wounded in battle as our new nation fought for independence. After the Revolutionary War, the Badge of Merit languished for over 100 years, but in 1932 the medal was reestablished as the Purple Heart. The Purple Heart currently bears Washington's likeness, and it has become a tangible symbol of the sacrifice the recipients have endured.

    Over the course of my Army career, I served alongside warriors – some of whom were wounded – and many who paid the ultimate price to protect liberty. I've found that even if the body is changed, the warrior spirit lives on in each service member. Wounded warriors are still the same energetic, dedicated individuals they were before – even if they have to accomplish their mission differently.

    Great organizations like the Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio and its Center for the Intrepid have made rehab accessible for military personnel wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq. Other organizations have provided support for veterans across the spectrum, from adapting homes to teaching job and life skills, and creating sports leagues for differently abled veterans. The technology in prosthetic limbs is remarkable, and the military has adapted its regulations in recent years to allow wounded personnel, including amputees, to continue to serve if they so desire.

    At Lockheed Martin, we have numerous opportunities to serve, from volunteering at the local VA hospital to engaging with military service organizations like the Fisher House, the USO, Toys for Tots and the Purple Heart Foundation.

  • George George

    George

    Aeronautical Engineer

    George

    George

    Aeronautical Engineer

    • George rode his motorcycle around the U.S. and Canada in one trip.
    • George encourages others to take the trip of their dreams.

    George is the kind of person who keeps a bucket list – a list of experiences or goals to achieve in a lifetime. This year, he was able to check the No.1 item off of his list that he never thought he would be able to achieve: circumnavigating the country on his motorcycle in a single trip. George packed up his 2007 BMW R1200GSA motorcycle and hit the road on a nine-week road trip around the U.S. and Canada, traveling a total of 20,900 miles with a typical day covering 400–700 miles. Below is a recollection of George's memories from his adventure of a lifetime.

    1. Where did you travel?
    I circumnavigated the continental U.S., Alaska and Canada. I traveled through 31 states, all 10 of Canada's provinces and one of Canada's three territories. I physically touched every major body of water surrounding North America (three oceans, three gulfs and one sea).

    2. Did you meet any interesting people?
    Most people I talked with wanted to hear of my travels, were very welcoming and friendly and were very eager to see if there was anything they could do to help me with my journey.

    3. What was the best food you ate?
    I had some amazing seafood on the shores of Newfoundland and Labrador. This is an area of Canada known for its lobster, crabbing and fishing communities. I ate a LOT of fresh seafood that night.

    4. Any advice for those who want to take a similar trip?
    If you see the opportunity to make your dream trip a reality, GO! If you don't take the opportunity or let your nerves keep you from starting, you will always wonder what it would have been like. Just remember to keep a journal and take lots of pictures.

    5. What is your favorite memory from the trip?
    Sleeping on the bike on the top of a mountain, hundreds of miles from civilization, in the Northern Yukon where there was only mountaintop after mountaintop for as far as the eye could see. Just me, my bike, a dirt road and wilderness for days. It was very peaceful.

    George
  • Mark Mark

    Mark

    Systems Engineer

    There are opportunities across a variety of products and services.

    Transcript [20KB DOCX]

  • Heather

    Heather

    Getting involved with the Supply Chain Security Council has been an amazing opportunity in learning what Lockheed Martin has to do to ensure our supply chain is protected. With the ongoing threat of terrorism, it is vital that we do whatever we can to protect our people and assets; I get to assist in that.

    Heather

    Heather

    Traffic Administrator

    Getting involved with the Supply Chain Security Council has been an amazing opportunity.

  • Mathew Mathew

    Mathew

    Mechanical Engineer

    The work that I do here at Lockheed Martin, it serves a cause that's bigger than any one of us individually.

    Transcript [15KB DOCX]

  • Paul Marks

    Paul

    Business Development Analyst

    The Company's core products have unparalleled performance proven by the increasing demand for our systems domestically and internationally. Such acheivements can only be attained by competent, capable and collaborative employees who are empowered with world-class processes and quality culture.

    Paul

    Paul

    Business Development Analyst

    Competent, capable and collaborative employees who are empowered with world-class processes and quality culture.

  • Sejal Shah

    Sejal

    I make a difference by coaching my team in helping them understand the intent of what we do and why we do it so they feel empowered to make decisions in difficult situations.

    Sejal

    Sejal

    Software Quality Engineer

    I coach my team to feel empowered to make decisions in difficult situations.

  • Kaitlyn Kaitlyn

    Kaitlyn

    Communications Representative

    I work with the engineers, understand what they do, and get that message across to our different audiences. It is a lot of fun.

    Transcript [15KB DOCX]

  • Tom Braun

    Tom

    Lockheed Martin's employees are second to none. We consistently hire top-notch people and there is an emphasis on creating a work environment where ideas can be freely shared, whether you are a new graduate or principal engineer.

    Tom

    Tom

    Research Engineer

    Ideas are freely shared, whether you are a new graduate or principal engineer.

  • Cynthia Cynthia

    Cynthia

    Subcontract Administrator

    It was so easy to transition from the Air Force to this culture of Lockheed Martin.

    Transcript [15KB DOCX]

  • Sean Sean

    Sean

    Business Development Analyst

    I came from active duty and jumped into business development.

    Transcript [20KB DOCX]

  • Jamie Jamie

    Jamie

    Electrical Engineer

    The Engineering Leadership Development Program really helps you understand that you're not just an engineer; you're a contributor.

    Transcript [19KB DOCX]

  • Cameron Cote

    Cameron

    Lockheed Martin values my efforts through competitive compensation and benefits like education assistance. The company also invests in my future through training and education programs.

    Cameron

    Cameron

    Systems Engineer

    Lockheed Martin does a great job at investing in my future through training and education programs.

  • Angel Angel

    Angel

    Systems Architect

    Lockheed Martin prides itself on volunteerism and giving back.

    Transcript [12KB DOCX]

  • Paul Paul

    Paul

    Systems Engineer

    Every day you're doing something that helps support the country.

    Transcript [20KB DOCX]

  • Eli Cuevas

    Eli

    Giving back! I was once an aviation storekeeper (U.S. Navy) and now being able to serve those who currently defend our freedom makes me so proud.

    Eli

    Eli

    Inspector

    Being able to serve those who currently defend our freedom makes me so proud.

  • Jill Jill

    Jill

    Systems Integration and Test Engineer

    Everyone brings their own unique perspective to everything we do.

    Transcript [20KB DOCX]

  • Carlos Carlos

    Carlos

    Finance Associate

    Our customers, whether they're in the DOD or they're in the commercial industry, everything we do – from the littlest thing to the biggest thing – is important.

    Transcript [19KB DOCX]

College Students

Experienced Professionals

Military

National

Perspectives

  • Chelsea Chelsea

    Chelsea

    Communications Representative

    Chelsea

    Chelsea

    Communications Representative

    • Chelsea shares details about her transition from college to the workforce.
    • Chelsea is a graduate of Texas Christian University and joined Lockheed Martin with an interest in community outreach.

    In college, community outreach and inclusiveness were extremely important to me. After applying to several for-profit companies, I found my desires for promoting diversity and helping the community still lingered. Never in a million years did I think a large corporation like Lockheed Martin would help me align my career goals and interests. The inclusiveness here has been felt and appreciated.

    As a Communications Representative at Lockheed Martin, recognizing inclusion and diversity continues to be an integral part of my personal and professional growth. I believe that diversity is more than acknowledging those who are different from you – it's a learning experience that allows you to view the world through a different lens. While here, I have felt reassured to find that my team shares a similar belief and that everyone is welcomed.

    No matter my coworkers' rank at Lockheed Martin, they never make me feel like the "new kid on the block." I enjoy meeting with my mentor, who is showing me the different paths I can take within the company. It's nice to be at a place where my work, professional growth and ideas are valued.

    Apart from my welcoming and collaborative team, I have found formal groups that share similar interests as me. My involvement with groups like the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has allowed me to network and become involved with the community and company. I have attended multiple events through organizations like the African American Council for Excellence (AACE), Toastmasters, Lockheed Martin Leadership Association (LMLA) and LMents. Each group has helped with my transition into this company and has given me the ability to meet many industry-leaders.

    At Lockheed Martin, we strive to embrace all ideas and serve the community. Now with six months of the "real world" under my belt, I can already look back and see the importance of coworkers welcoming me. I'm looking forward to doing the same for future associates!

    Military aircraft Chelsea is a part of the Aeronautics business area at Lockheed Martin.
  • Julissa Julissa

    Julissa

    Workforce Strategy

    Julissa

    Julissa

    Workforce Strategy

    • Julissa explains her relationship-centric take on the acronym ROI
    • Here are the two simple questions Julissa asks herself every work day: What problem do I need to solve today? How can I leverage or develop relationships?

    The acronym ROI in the workplace refers to the measurement of Relationships Over Issues. It is critical to build relationships with co-workers in order to have a productive and healthy work environment. Unfortunately, for many years my ROI rate was less than desirable. I was more focused on work than on building relationships with my team.

    I started my career at Lockheed Martin straight out of college, and luckily for me it was a great fit from the beginning. I entered having a results-oriented mindset; however, over time I have learned the importance of slowing down and establishing relationships with my colleagues. This learning experience directly correlates to our leadership's high value for collaboration with open and honest communication.

    At Lockheed Martin, we work with extremely bright and talented people. What makes us unique is that we all have diverse backgrounds with different experiences. Working among peers who think differently allows us all to see the world in a different light. We are able to learn something new from each other every day. The result is a team that is empowered to collaborate and bring forth creative solutions that encourage mission success.

    As you look to measure your ROI by assessing the relationship strength with colleagues and customers, here are some questions to consider:

    • Have you taken the time to get to know someone?
    • Do others see you as someone they can count on?

    After reflecting on the relationships I have fostered over the years, I can happily say that my ROI is in the positive. This approach opened my aperture to develop meaningful relationships at work and allowed me to balance both my short- and long-term goals, which helped me advance my career. As John C. Maxwell once said, "People don't care how much you know until they know how much you care."

    Julissa Julissa participating as a panelist at an IT conference.
  • Sarfaraz Sarfaraz

    Sarfaraz

    Price Cost Analyst

    Sarfaraz

    Sarfaraz

    Price Cost Analyst

    • Sarfaraz shares his journey from Pakistan to chase the American dream.
    • Sarfaraz speaks Punjabi, Urdu, English and some Arabic.
    • Sarfaraz won second place at the Toastmasters World Championship of Public Speaking.

    Many moons ago, I stepped off a Boeing 747 at John F. Kennedy International Airport and stepped onto American soil for the first time, in search of a better future. I spent my first night in America at the YMCA in Oklahoma City. The next morning I took a bus and arrived at the administration building at Oklahoma State University with one suitcase, one carry-on bag and one briefcase with a cashier's check for three semesters of tuition and expenses.

    I learned from my parents, who led a simple life, about integrity, ethical conduct and treating everyone with dignity and respect because each individual is significant. Treating everyone with kindness has allowed me to excel during my 25 years at Lockheed Martin. Mutual respect for one another has enabled me, as a Price Cost Analyst in the Global Supply Chain at Missiles and Fire Control in Dallas, to work effectively with my peers and management, our suppliers and our customers.

    I believe valuing our differences and working in harmony with one another allows us to do our job with an attitude that uplifts all of us. Treating others with dignity, respect and appreciating all viewpoints has allowed me to be successful in my work. It is the reason for where I am today and for how far I have come since the day I first arrived in America.

    If I add up what I have accomplished and subtract from it what I came to America with – one suitcase, one carry-on bag and one briefcase with a cashier's check for three semesters of tuition and expenses – the difference is "The American Dream."

    Sarfaraz Sarfaraz received second place at the Toastmasters International 2000 World Championship of Public Speaking semifinals in Galveston, Texas.
  • Sean Sean

    Sean

    Senior Engineer

    Sean

    Sean

    Senior Engineer

    • Sean is a member of the Advanced Technology Laboratories where he's focused on making systems smarter through the application of machine learning and artificial intelligence.

    For the past three years, my role within Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (ATL) has been multifaceted, challenging and exciting. As a member in the Spectrum Systems Laboratory within ATL, I was the test lead on the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Behavioral Learning for Adaptive Electronic Warfare (BLADE) program, an effort to build a cognitive Electronic Warfare (EW) system that can engage adaptive wireless communication targets and develop effective electronic attack techniques in real time.

    My main objective was to design laboratory and field tests, and supervise their execution. While I hoped for BLADE to succeed, I was also very interested in understanding how BLADE performed. I realized that my success, and that of the BLADE team, was best measured by how efficiently we used the time we spent testing.

    Whenever a test would fail, I'd remind myself that it wasn't necessarily a bad thing so we could walk away with an understanding of the causes of failure in order to improve future results. Often, when this occurred in the field, my team and I would work to devise a new plan on the spot. Our willingness and ability to improvise became our best attribute, without which success would have been impossible. I found that regrouping with my team to reorganize strategies was incredibly useful. As a result, this became a daily occurrence on our days of field testing.

    The BLADE team's ability to collaborate and think on their feet enabled an excellent demo that left an indelible mark on those who witnessed it. As a result of our efforts, the BLADE team was awarded a Lockheed Martin NOVA award and two ATL special recognition awards, and I received an Engineer of the Year Award during ATL's 2016 Honors Night. But more importantly, we established credibility with our customer community and developed an incredible bond in order to begin working toward bringing BLADE technology out of the experimental realm and into warfighter's hands.

    Sean Sean out in the field with team.
  • Stephanie Stephanie

    Stephanie

    Project Manager

    Stephanie

    Stephanie

    Project Manager

    • In 2016, Stephanie competed in the Ironman World Championships in Hawaii.
    • Stephanie shares how her Ironman training regimen and intense preparation benefits her at Lockheed Martin.

    1. What is involved in an Ironman Triathlon, and what does your training entail?
    Stephanie: An Ironman Triathlon is more than just a 140.6-mile, multi-sport race – it is a test of mental and physical strength. Training requires physical and mental preparation supported by a strong nutritional and recovery program. Physical training is for endurance; it is three hours a day Monday through Friday, and five to six hours a day on Saturday and Sunday. Mental training prepares the brain to endure the pain, suffering and, at times, boredom.

    2. How did you decide to get involved with Ironman?
    Stephanie: I began training for triathlons two years ago, in the summer of 2014. My husband and I signed up for a long-distance triathlon, and from then on I was hooked. I was extremely athletic in college, so it was a natural progression to gain the discipline in order to accomplish a triathlon.

    3. Have you ever wanted to stop training? What kept you going?
    Stephanie: Some days it's hard to feel motivated for that second workout (especially when it's 100 degrees outside) but no, I never want to quit. I know consistency helps me achieve my goals, so I don't like to give up.

    4. What benefits do you see at work as a result of your training?
    Stephanie: One of my favorite quotes is: "Excellence is the gradual result of always striving to do better." I am a goal-oriented person who thrives on checking items off a to-do list and achieving my goals, both in my personal and work life. The goal at work isn't a "PR" like a race, but to finish my projects, make improvements, and support my manager. I have had to remain focused throughout training and triathlons and these practices carry over into my work at Lockheed Martin as well.

    Stephanie Stephanie cycling as she pushes to complete an Ironman triathlon.
  • Rosa Rosa

    Rosa

    Applications Engineer, Aeronautics

    Rosa

    Rosa

    Applications Engineer, Aeronautics

    • Rosa has been an engineer with the Production Operations group at Lockheed Martin for over 10 years.
    • Rosa is a big advocate of increasing the number of women in STEM fields.
    • Her husband is also an engineer at Lockheed Martin, and they are both active members of the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers.

    At times, I reflect back and remember the choices I made that created a pathway to my Lockheed Martin career. One of the most important choices I made when pursuing an engineering degree was joining the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE). I was able to acquire my first internship at Lockheed Martin with the F-2 program through a job fair held at the annual SHPE National Conference. They offered interactive networking sessions; presentations by industry leaders; Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) development workshops; and technical and career opportunities to students and professionals.

    These experiences shaped my career path and helped me arrive in my current position. As an engineering professional, I joined SHPE Lockheed Martin Aeronautics to provide the same support and development that was initially offered to me. The organization strives to provide awareness of STEM initiatives and empower students in Tarrant County to enter technical roles.

    Today there are a limited number of women entering engineering fields. Women professionals can make a direct impact in helping young female students envision themselves in a STEM profession. Being a professional role model is truly rewarding, and we should all do our part by encouraging young female students to decide the avenue they will follow, rather than limit their choices based on perceptions.

    I highly encourage everyone to become involved in a STEM outreach organization. Providing a positive direction to students by enabling team participation and critical-thinking challenges allows for students with diverse backgrounds to have meaningful experiences. Through these events, students become fully engaged and obtain a deeper understanding and a greater appreciation for math and science. The engineering design activities prepare them to be in a competitive environment, strengthen their skill set and allow them to gain confidence in interactive, team-based activities.

  • Joe Joe

    Joe

    Government Relations Director

    Joe

    Joe

    Government Relations Director

    • Joe shares the history of the Purple Heart and the support available for wounded veterans.
    • Joe is a U.S. Army veteran.

    One of our nation's most recognizable medals for military service is the Purple Heart. August 7 marks Purple Heart Day and, as I reflect on the day's significance, I'm reminded that we owe a debt to each of the soldiers, sailors, Marines, airmen and Coast Guardsmen who are recipients of this most respected symbol.

    The origin story for the medal is pretty unique. The Badge of Merit was conceptually developed by George Washington to honor the brave and meritorious soldiers of his Continental Army, many of whom were wounded in battle as our new nation fought for independence. After the Revolutionary War, the Badge of Merit languished for over 100 years, but in 1932 the medal was reestablished as the Purple Heart. The Purple Heart currently bears Washington's likeness, and it has become a tangible symbol of the sacrifice the recipients have endured.

    Over the course of my Army career, I served alongside warriors – some of whom were wounded – and many who paid the ultimate price to protect liberty. I've found that even if the body is changed, the warrior spirit lives on in each service member. Wounded warriors are still the same energetic, dedicated individuals they were before – even if they have to accomplish their mission differently.

    Great organizations like the Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio and its Center for the Intrepid have made rehab accessible for military personnel wounded in Afghanistan and Iraq. Other organizations have provided support for veterans across the spectrum, from adapting homes to teaching job and life skills, and creating sports leagues for differently abled veterans. The technology in prosthetic limbs is remarkable, and the military has adapted its regulations in recent years to allow wounded personnel, including amputees, to continue to serve if they so desire.

    At Lockheed Martin, we have numerous opportunities to serve, from volunteering at the local VA hospital to engaging with military service organizations like the Fisher House, the USO, Toys for Tots and the Purple Heart Foundation.

  • George George

    George

    Aeronautical Engineer

    George

    George

    Aeronautical Engineer

    • George rode his motorcycle around the U.S. and Canada in one trip.
    • George encourages others to take the trip of their dreams.

    George is the kind of person who keeps a bucket list – a list of experiences or goals to achieve in a lifetime. This year, he was able to check the No.1 item off of his list that he never thought he would be able to achieve: circumnavigating the country on his motorcycle in a single trip. George packed up his 2007 BMW R1200GSA motorcycle and hit the road on a nine-week road trip around the U.S. and Canada, traveling a total of 20,900 miles with a typical day covering 400–700 miles. Below is a recollection of George's memories from his adventure of a lifetime.

    1. Where did you travel?
    I circumnavigated the continental U.S., Alaska and Canada. I traveled through 31 states, all 10 of Canada's provinces and one of Canada's three territories. I physically touched every major body of water surrounding North America (three oceans, three gulfs and one sea).

    2. Did you meet any interesting people?
    Most people I talked with wanted to hear of my travels, were very welcoming and friendly and were very eager to see if there was anything they could do to help me with my journey.

    3. What was the best food you ate?
    I had some amazing seafood on the shores of Newfoundland and Labrador. This is an area of Canada known for its lobster, crabbing and fishing communities. I ate a LOT of fresh seafood that night.

    4. Any advice for those who want to take a similar trip?
    If you see the opportunity to make your dream trip a reality, GO! If you don't take the opportunity or let your nerves keep you from starting, you will always wonder what it would have been like. Just remember to keep a journal and take lots of pictures.

    5. What is your favorite memory from the trip?
    Sleeping on the bike on the top of a mountain, hundreds of miles from civilization, in the Northern Yukon where there was only mountaintop after mountaintop for as far as the eye could see. Just me, my bike, a dirt road and wilderness for days. It was very peaceful.

    George